02 May 2014
Preparing for afterLIFE: Catchment management for the River Allow
26 April 2014

Listen to Dr Fran Igoe talk to Frank Lewis on the Saturday Supplement, with guest speakers, on the wildlife and environmental work in Duhallow (April 26th 2014)

Listen Now

22 April 2014
IRD Duhallow's work on Biodiversity recognised

 Recently IRD Duhallow were invited to present at an international meeting on biodiversity and LEADER and showcase work carried out to help biodiversity in Duhallow. We were delighted to be able to facilitate and provide examples where the LIFE project has contributed at a practical level to the furthering of biodiversity in Duhallow but working closely with our colleagues in IRD Duhallow.

30 September 2013
30 September 2013
11 January 2013

IRD Duhallow LIFE Project on Nuacht TG4 (Jan 11 2013)

30 October 2012
17 March 2012

An EU-funded project to eradicate an invasive plant which is eroding land and putting important fish habitats in a north Cork river at risk was launched today by Minister for the Environment Phil Hogan.

Himalayan Balsam, which was introduced from India as an ornamental plant for its attractive pink flowers, has spread from gardens to roadsides and is now causing serious problems on river banks and habitats throughout Ireland including in north Cork.

23 December 2011
A NEW study on the number of otters in north Cork will provide the basis for a series of measures aimed at encouraging an increase in the otter population across a wide area. The study by IRD Duhallow is part of a €1 million EU Life+ funded project aimed at increasing otter numbers on the Allow, Dalua and Brogeen tributaries of the Blackwater. Read Full Article at The Irish Times
17 December 2011

The European otter is an iconic Irish animal species which was much more widespread in former times. This dark furry mammal is most usually found near watercourses, hence the common Irish name for it , an Madra U isce. People fortu nate enough to encounter ot ter, o f ten remark on its intrinsic beauty and playfulness; if the observer is patient enough female otters can sometimes be seen playing with their young as they teach them the essential skills necessary for survival in later life.